BPO Dials, Automatic, No's 10 - 54


Click here for Trigger Dial adjustment information - Dials No's 12 - 19

Click here for Slipping Cam Dial adjustment information - Dials No's 10 & 11

Click here for an explanation of how dials work

Click here for early GPO dials - No's 1 - 9

Some of the text below is taken from:-

TELECOMMUNICATIONS INSTRUCTION, C MARKETING, INSTALLATION, 3 Internal, M0015, Issue 1, Sept 1971.
&
ENGINEERING INSTRUCTION, TELEPHONES, Automatic, B1003, Issue 1 & Issue 2, Oct 1955 & May 1965.
&
P.O. Engineering Dept. Technical Instructions XXV. Part 24 - Description and Adjustment of Dial Mechanisms, May 1928.

 

DIALS, AUTOMATIC, No's 10 to 54

Scope
This page describes the dials No. 10 - 54 and gives general information relating to their operation, use and maintenance.  Details of the dials are given in Table 1 .  Dials stocked by the Supplies Dept. and the installations at which they are used are shown in Table 2 .  The number, date and manufacturer of the dial can generally be found on the underneath of the dial, on the rim.  See the Dial No. 10 - rear view as an example.

General
For a long time all the dials used by the British Post Office were of the slipping-cam type which were superseded by a trigger type.  However, a large number of the slipping cam dials are still in use and will remain so for a number of years.  Dials of the trigger type are fully interchangeable with their counterparts of the slipping-cam type. 

Dial terminal arrangements
The arrangement of the terminal connections on each dial is similar but there are slight differences in physical dimensions.  The electrical characteristics are identical. Dgms. N 581 to N 584, N 588, N 610, N 612 and N 613 show the terminal numbering and spring-set connections.  Dials, Automatic, No's 51 to 54 have differing spring and terminal layouts.  In these cases the terminal numbers are printed on the dial case or dust cover.

Terminal Connections

Dial No. 21 Dial No. 22 Dial No. 23 Dial No. 24 Dial No. 28

TABLE 1

Dials, Automatic, No.Type of mechanism Finger plate Speed (P.P.S.) Ratio % break Remarks
10LA   Slipping cam   Stainless-steel   10+/-1   63 - 70   Superseded by No. 12LA
11LASlipping cam Stainless-steel 10+/-163 - 70 Superseded by No. 13FA
12LATrigger   Stainless-steel   10+/-1   63 - 70   Superseded by No. 21LA
13FATrigger   Stainless-steel   10+/-163 - 70   Superseded by No. 22FA
14LATrigger Matt Black Enamel10+/-1 63 - 70    
14LA/2 V.F.TriggerMatt Black Enamel10+/-0.5 64.6 - 68.6Use on positions at exchanges with 2VF (Signalling)
15FT3Trigger   Stainless-steel   11.75+/-0.5   76 - 80   Superseded by No. 25LT3
15FT4Trigger   Stainless-steel   11.75+/-0.5   48 - 52   Superseded by No. 25LT4
16FATrigger   Stainless-steel   10+/-0.5   64.6 - 68.6   Superseded by No. 25LA
16FT3Trigger   Stainless-steel   11.75+/-0.5   76 - 80   Superseded by No. 25LT3
16FT4Trigger   Stainless-steel   11.75+/-0.5   48 - 52   Superseded by No. 25LT4
17LATrigger   Aluminium alloy   10+/-163 - 70  
19FATrigger   Stainless-steel   10+/-1   See Note   Superseded by No. 24FA
20LATrigger   Stainless-steel   10+/-1   63 - 70   Superseded by No. 23LA
21CATrigger   P.V.C. (Colour)   10+/-1   63 - 70 
21CATrigger   Stainless-steel   10+/-1   63 - 70 
21LATrigger   P.V.C. Black   10+/-1   63 - 70 
21FATrigger Clear plastic10+/-163 - 70 
21FA Steel TriggerStainless-steel 10+/-163 - 70Used in public coin boxes
1/21FATrigger Clear Plastic 10+/-163 - 70Used on Teles. 776
22FATrigger   Stainless-steel   10+/-1   63 - 70 
23LA   Trigger   Stainless-steel   10+/-1   63 - 70 
24FA   Trigger   Stainless-steel   10+/-1   See Note 
25CATrigger   P.V.C., Grey   10+/-1   63 - 70 
25FT3 TriggerClear 11.75+/-0.5   76 - 80Used on testers
25FT4Trigger Clear11.75+/-0.5   48 - 52Used on testers
25LA Trigger   P.V.C., Black   10+/-0.5   64.6 - 68.6 Used on testers
25LT3 Trigger   P.V.C., Black   11.75+/-0.5   76 - 80Used on testers
25LT4 Trigger   P.V.C., Black   11.75+/-0.5   48 - 52Used on testers
26LA Slipping cam   Stainless-steel   10+/-1   63 - 70   Modified Dial, Automatic, No. 10 in flame-proof enclosure
28LA Trigger   Stainless-steel   10+/-1   63 - 70 
30FA Trigger   Clear   10+/-1   63 - 70   Fluorescent tube beneath number ring
35FA Trigger   Clear   10+/-0.5   64.6 - 68.6   Similar to 25FA but specially adjusted for testers
51Trigger   Clear   10+/-1   63 - 70   GEC proprietary design. Used in lieu of Dials 21
52ATrigger   Clear   10+/-1   63 - 70   STC proprietary design. Used in lieu of Dials 21
53ATrigger   Clear   10+/-1   63 - 70   STC proprietary design. Used in lieu of Dials 30FA
54ATrigger   Clear   10+/-1   63 - 70   EMI proprietary design. Used in lieu of Dials 21

NOTE: Change-over unit, nominal operate to normal ratio of 3:2 within the limits of 56-64% operate.

TABLE 2

Apparatus or equipment   NotesDial, Automatic, No.
Subscribers' apparatus  700 type telephones  21CA, (Colour), 21F, 25CA, 28LA
  700 type post 196921FA, 28FA, 51 - 54 (clear)
  Pre-700 type telephones  10LA, 12LA, 28LA, 21LA, Black
  P.B.X. switchboards  21LA, Black
Coin-box installations  Pay-on-answer  21CA, Steel
  Pre-payment, director  23LA
  Pre-payment, non-director  22FA
Exchange manual switchboards  21LA, Black
Testers  50% break  25LT4, 25FT4
  66.6% break  25LA
  80% break  25LT3, 25FT3
Telegraphs  Telex installations  24FA
  T.A.S. installations  21LA, Black
Telephone No. 280 Test telephone17LA
Telephone No. 722Trimphone30
Telephone No. 149 26LA
Telephone No. 776Compact 1/21FA Clear

The Rate Book number of each dial is followed by characters which indicate the type of number ring and pulse wheel fitted.  The first letter indicates the number ring, namely, "B" special dial for the Brighton area, "F" has figures only, "L" letters and figures, "C" has neither letters nor figures.

B F L

Click here for more information on the Brighton Dial

The second letter and any following number refer to the type of pulse wheel, shown below.  Dials stocked by the Supplies Dept. and their use at various installations are shown in Table 2 .

  • Type A = 66.6/33.3 - used on normal GPO Strowger exchanges.
  • Type S = 33.3% break for Grimsby, Stockport, Southampton, Hurley and Ramsey (Siemens Bros.)
  • Type W = 18.5% break plus final break of not less than 92.5% of the total impulse period, for Dudley and Darlington (STC Rotary).
A S W

Description of Dials, Automatic, No. 10LA (slipping-cam type)
The Dial, Automatic, No. 10LA, consists of a circular case in the centre of which is a brass bush in which the main spindle and gear-wheel turn.  On the main spindle, at the rear of the dial, are mounted a main spring in a spring box, a pulse wheel, a slipping cam between washers, a spring washer and an off- normal lever.  The outer end of the main spring is anchored in the spring box, which is keyed to the spindle, and the inner end of the spring engages in a slot in the brass bush.  When the spindle is rotated clockwise, as viewed from the dial front, the spring is wound up.  The dial mechanism is held in its rest position against the tension of the main spring by a screw in the main gear-wheel engaging with a post in the case.  Removal of the screw allows the main spring to unwind.  Within the case are mounted a centrifugal governor and worm on a common spindle, and a gear-wheel which drives the worm.  A pinion on the gear-wheel shaft meshes with the main gear-wheel on the main spindle so that the governor spins rapidly when the mechanism runs.  The governor weights move outwards under centrifugal force and, at the required speed, bear on the inner surface of the governor cup to exert a braking influence on the spindle.  This keeps the speed of the mechanism within the required limits.

Original Dial No. 10 front view Later Dial No. 10 front view Dial No. 10 rear view

The governor gear-wheel assembly includes a simple 'free-wheel' device consisting of a coiled spring coupling which slips when the dial is wound up, so that the governor does not resist this motion.

The front of the case is enclosed by the number ring, which is held in the case by a spring ring.

The finger-plate assembly is attached to the main spindle boss which just protrudes through the number ring.  This assembly comprises the finger plate, label-holder, and a backing plate to give rigidity to the finger plate.

The pulsing mechanism consists of the pulse wheel and slipping cam on the main spindle and the pulse lever and spring-set mounted on the rear of the case.

The spring-set assembly also contains two auxiliary contacts which are normally held open by an insulating bush on the off-normal lever.  When the finger plate is moved from its normal position, these contacts make in sequence and re-open in the reverse order on its return.

Dial No. 10 - (GEC picture taken around 1928)

.

The above picture depicts a Dial No. 10 with an Australian dial label

Operation of the slipping-cam mechanism
The pulse wheel is keyed to the main spindle and the slipping cam is frictionally coupled to the wheel by steel washers under the pressure of the phosphor-bronze spring washer.  Movement of the cam is restricted by its two lugs engaging a forked stop mounted on the dial case.

When a digit is selected, the pulse wheel and slipping cam rotate together at first and the raised sector of the cam moves under the set of the pulse lever.  The pulse contacts are thus kept closed.  Then, the longer lug of the slipping cam strikes the forked stop to prevent any further rotation of the cam.  The pulse wheel continues to rotate and the cut-away sectors are exposed from under the cam.  The number of sectors that appear is determined by the digit selected.

When the finger plate is released, the mechanism rotates back to its normal position with the governor controlling the speed.  During the first part of the return motion, the slipping cam and pulse wheel move together, so that the pulse lever slides over the cam.  Thus, the pulse contacts remain closed for 220 milli-seconds (at 10 p.p.s.) to give the minimum inter-digital pause.  This period ends when the slipping cam has rotated sufficiently for its raised sector to clear the set of the pulse lever, which then drops on to the lower sector to open the pulse contacts.  Further movement of the slipping cam is prevented by its shorter lug striking the forked stop.  As the pulse wheel continues to rotate, each 'tooth' raises the pulse lever and closes the contacts until the contacts are finally closed at the normal position of the dial.

Parts for Dials No's 10 & 11

Dial, Automatic, No. 10 Additional Information
Variations in Dial, Auto., No. 10 - The first issue of No. 10 dial had the same type of slipping cam as No. 8, i.e., a cam without a long projection, and the dial was also provided with a finger stop having slotted fixing holes instead of round fixing holes.  The slotted fixing holes were provided to facilitate compliance with the condition prescribed in para. 9, viz., that when the finger plate is rotated so that the finger rests against the finger stop, a corner of an impulse wheel tooth appears from behind the slipping cam.  Since the correct travel of the slipping cam cannot be obtained by bending the long projection, it is obtained by adjustment of the position of the finger stop.

It follows from the above that if an old pattern cam or an old pattern finger stop requires replacement, both these parts must be substituted by the standard items.

The first issue can be identified as the Mk 234 and the second variant as the Mark 235.

The Dial No. 10 was drilled to take the finger stop in two positions.  Normally the finger stop is further (clockwise) around the dial circumference, so as to allow the standard interdigital pause (see picture below).

Ron Kay in New Zealand writes:-
When the coloured Siemens Brothers Neophones first arrived in New Zealand in 1933 they were pictured in advertisements in the Telephone Directories with the finger stop in the 4 o'clock position.  This was to suppress the minimum pause which is not needed with Rotary as the register only has to step its in-pulsing control sequence switch a small distance between digits.  This alternative position was on all BPO dials until about 1951 when the first trigger dials started to appear.  By this stage I would say all Rotary registers had been changed to standard pulsing.  I notice the two options for the finger stop pictured in a dial in Telephony by Atkinson, so it looks as though all dials produced at the time had this feature.

Dial No. 10 - Australian version

Dial, Automatic, No. 11
This dial is the same as the Dial, Automatic No. 10, except that it has an additional set of springs that are operated by a cam fitted to the dial spindle.  These are used in Coinbox installations.  The cam has a number of drillings that will accept a rod.  The rod is moved to correspond with the digit that operates the springset.

Dial Auto. No. 11 Rear View - Extra springset is to the right

Description of Dials, Automatic, No. 12LA (trigger type)
The general construction of this trigger type dial is similar to that of the slipping-cam type.

The trigger dial differs from the slipping-cam dial on the following major points:-

(a) An articulated trigger assembly is used for the pulsing mechanism.  This assembly has two main parts: a swinging lever which pivots about a screw in the main case, and a trigger which pivots on a pin at the free end of the swinging lever.  A flat spring, which is part of the spring-set assembly, bears on the trigger to ensure its set follows the contour of the pulse wheel.

(b) The pulse contacts comprise a lever spring tensioned against a stiff buffer spring and they are moved apart by an insulating bush on the trigger striking an extension of the lever spring.

(c) The dial mechanism is held in its rest position by a spring stop plate which is fastened by the screws that hold the bearing bracket for the governor gear wheel.  A lug on the stop plate engages with a pin on the underside of the main gear-wheel when the plate is sprung upwards by a screw inserted through the back of the case.  Slackening the screw allows the stop plate to spring away from the gear-wheel and let the main spring unwind.

(d) The number ring has a smaller hole in the centre so that it is more difficult for dust to get into the dial mechanism.

Dial No. 12 front view Dial No. 12 rear view

Operation of the trigger mechanism
When a digit is selected, the end of the trigger engages with the first tooth of the pulse wheel and is flipped backwards.   Further rotation of the pulse wheel causes the end of the trigger to ride over the 'teeth' and the number of teeth that pass equals the number selected.

When the finger plate is released, the mechanism rotates in the opposite direction and the trigger is moved back to the pulsing position.  This movement occurs m approximately 240 milliseconds, giving the minimum inter-digital pause.  Having reached the pulsing position, the trigger rides over the teeth of the pulse wheel and the insulating bush breaks the pulsing contacts at each tooth.

The number of pulses sent equals the number of teeth over which the trigger passed when the dial was wound up.

Purpose of the slipping-cam and trigger mechanisms Both mechanisms provide the minimum inter-digital pause before pulses are sent out so that:-

(a) If a subscriber commences to dial without waiting for the receipt of dialling tone the delay in sending the first pulse provides additional time to allow a free outlet to be seized.

(b) the dial mechanism is able to attain its governed speed before it sends out pulses.

Neither of these advantages could be achieved with P.O. dials if the pause occurred after the pulse train, instead of before it.

Advantages of the trigger mechanism

(a) Its operation does not rely on frictional contact between surfaces, as in the slipping-cam design.  Frictional contact can vary considerably during the years of service without attention that are expected of a dial, and departure from the correct value can cause false pulsing or stalling.

(b) The position to which the finger plate must be rotated to select the digit required is less critical than with the slipping-cam design, in which a small variation can cause a shortened first pulse or a false one.  With the trigger design the correct number of pulses will be obtained if the finger plate is moved short of, or past, the finger stop by half the diameter of the finger hole.

(c) Wear of the pulse contacts and wear of the trigger set or pulse wheel affect the pulse ratio in opposite ways, so that any changes tend to neutralise one another.

With the slipping cam wear tends to increase the break to make ratio of the pulses.

Description of Dials, Automatic, No. 13FA (trigger type)
Dials for some types of coin collecting box circuits require auxiliary contacts which break when certain digits are selected and remain open until the pulsing stops.

The general construction of the No. 13... dial is similar to the standard trigger dial but an auxiliary spring-set and associated parts are mounted on the back of the dial.

The contacts of the auxiliary spring-set are normally held in the 'made' position by a cam mounted on an extension of the main spindle.  A small control cam, loosely coupled to the main spindle by a spring clip, is mounted between the contact cam and the off-normal lever, and its movement is limited in both directions by a stop plate which is fixed to the supporting bracket of the main spring-set assembly.  A masking disk is fitted over the pulse wheel to reduce the effective height of every tooth except the first one, and the insulating bush on the trigger is longer than that on the normal trigger dial.

Operation of the coin-box auxiliary contact
The auxiliary cam is free to turn on the main spindle and has a light helical spring attached to it from a bracket on the auxiliary spring-set assembly.  Two control pins are riveted into the cam and project on the underside so that the off-normal bush can strike them.

When any digit up to and including '8' is selected, the spindle moves independently of the cam, which is held in its normal position by the pressure of the auxiliary spring-set.

If '9' or '0' is selected, the insulating bush on the off-normal lever strikes the operating pin (that furthest from the anchor screw for the helical spring) and rotates the cam to allow the auxiliary contacts to break.  During the return motion the contacts remain open because the helical spring is not strong enough to turn the cam and lift the lever spring up the cam step.  After the last pulse has been sent, the off-normal bush strikes the resetting pin (nearest to the anchor screw) and resets the cam and contacts to their normal position.

When free dialling of digit '8' is required, another control pin can be screwed into the tapped hole in the cam.

Prevention of fraudulent calls
The control cam, the masking disk, the longer trigger bush and the light helical spring in No. 13FA dials function to prevent certain forms of fraudulent calls being made.

Dials Automatic, No. 14
This dial was available in three versions:-

  1. 14FA  for use in Non-Director areas for use on manual positions other than 2VF;

  2. 14LA  for use in Director areas for use on manual positions other than 2VF;

  3. 14LA/2VF for use on positions at exchanges with 2VF. Adjusted to 9.5 to 10.5 pps and 66 2/3+/- 2% break.  The 14FA used number ring 304 whilst the LA & LF/2VF used NR305 (same rings that were used on No 12 dials).

Dial, Automatic, No. 14 is shown pictured to the right.

Dials, Automatic, Nos. 15... and 16
These dials are for testers and are of the trigger type.  Details of their speeds and ratios are included in Table 1.  The standard governor mechanism is used, specially adjusted to give the required speeds, and the special pulse ratios are obtained by the use of different pulse wheels.

The Dial No. 16 dials are fitted with an extra spring-set and off-normal lever.  The spring-set is similar to the auxiliary one on the Dial No. 13FA dial and is operated directly by the additional off-normal lever which is mounted on an extension of the main spindle.  The angular position of this lever can be varied so that the spring-set is operated and the contacts made at different positions of the finger plate.

It is thus possible to utilise the contacts as make contacts for any particular instant in the travel of the dial, or as break contacts for the duration of the operation of the dial.

Dials, Automatic, No. 17LA
This dial is used for the Telephone No. 280.  It has the same pulsing mechanism as the Dial, Automatic, No. 12 described above but its mechanism is mounted on a smaller case than that of the No. 12 dial.  The number ring fits closely over the case and is printed with figures only.  The finger plate is also smaller than that used on the No. 12 dial and is printed with letters in positions corresponding to the figures on the number ling.

Dials, Automatic, No. 19FA
This is a trigger type dial having a similar form of construction to the No. 12 dial.  It is fitted with one pair of off-normal contacts and. the pulsing action is effected with a change-over unit.  This dial is used for signalling on automatic telegraph switching systems and the double pulse of the change-over contacts is adjusted to a nominal 3:2 (operate to normal) ratio.  A Dial No. 19 (rear view) is pictured to the right.

Dials, Automatic, No. 20LA
This is a trigger type dial having a similar form of construction to the Dial, Automatic, No. 12.  It permits free dialling of digits '1', '9' and '0' and is used on prepayment coin-collecting boxes in director areas.  The operation of the auxiliary spring-set for the dialling of '9' and '0' is the same as that of the Dial No. 13 dial.  To give the free dialling of digit '1' the masking disk is also used as a cam which, in conjunction with an operating lever, controls the auxiliary spring-set assembly.  It is arranged that the auxiliary contacts are opened, or remain open for the duration of the last pulse of each pulse train.

In the normal position of the finger plate, the auxiliary contacts are opened by the operating lever which is resting on its cam.  As the finger plate is rotated clockwise, the cam releases the lever, and the contacts close.  The operation of the auxiliary spring-set is as previously described for the Dials, Automatic, No. 13FA dial until the make period of the pulsing springs immediately before the last pulse is transmitted.  During this make period the lever will again come under the control of the cam.  If the contacts have already been opened by the switching cam, when dialling '9' or '0', the lever will only increase the contact gap.  If a digit other than '9' or '0' is dialled, the auxiliary contacts will be closed, until they are opened by the lever during the make period immediately before the last pulse, and will remain open until the dial is re-operated.

Description of moulded body dial
The mechanism is essentially the same as that of the trigger dials previously described, except that it is mounted on a steel baseplate attached to a black moulding which forms the body.  The material of the pulsing contacts has been changed to palladium to avoid high resistance contacts which have occurred on earlier dials.  The number ring is located on two pillars between which its retaining spring is clipped.  The finger plate is formed from rigid P.V.C. sheet in the colour range to match 700-type telephones.  The label protector is moulded in clear polymethyl methacrylate.  It snaps into position in the finger plate, and is held by three pips which are equally spaced around its periphery.  A stainless-steel finger plate has been retained for some dials, e.g. those fitted at public call offices.  The dial mechanism is held in the rest position by a screw passing through a lug on the steel baseplate and engaging with a pin screwed into the main gear-wheel.

Removal of the label protector
The label protector should be removed by one of the following methods:-

  1. Extractor No. 29.  This is a rubber suction disk with a finger grip.  The extractor should be firmly pressed on to the label protector and then sharply pulled away.  It can be released from the protector by sliding or by lifting one edge of the rubber with the finger nail.
     
  2. For the coloured finger plate use a small bladed flat screwdriver (Screwdriver, Instrument, No. 1).  This should be inserted radially between the finger plate and the number ring at the 3 o'clock position on the dial.  The screwdriver will then enter a slot in the finger plate, and by turning the screwdriver beneath the pip in a thin metal plate which is under the label protector the protector will be ejected.  Care must be taken to ensure that the end of the screwdriver is under the metal plate and not between the plate and the label protector.  It is advisable to hold two fingers over the protector to restrain it during ejection.
     
  3. For the clear finger plate, another method is to use a piece of Sellotape.  Roll the Sellotape into a circle about 2 inches diameter with the sticky side outwards.  Stick to the dial cover, covering as much of the cover as possible.  Pull the Sellotape towards you.

Click here for more information on the Dial No. 20.

Dials, Automatic, No. 21CA, (Colour)
This moulded body dial is for use with 700-type telephones.  The number ring fitted is in matching colour and has printed arrow heads (chaplets) which appear beneath the finger holes.  Some earlier Dials, Automatic, No. 21CA, (Colour) will have number rings without arrow heads.  Introduced in July 1959.  The dial shown on the right is a Dials, Automatic, No. 21CA Red.

Dials, Automatic, No. 21CA Steel
This dial is for use on Telephone No. 705 . It is similar to the Dial, Automatic, No. 21CA, (Colour) but is fitted with a stainless- steel finger plate.  The number ring is as fitted on Dials, Automatic, No. 21CA, Green.

Dials, Automatic, No. 21LA
This dial is similar to Dial, Automatic, No. 21CA, Black with the exception that it is fitted with a number ring printed with figures and letters.  It supersedes Dial, Automatic, No. 12LA.

Dials, Automatic, No. 21FA Clear
Introduced in June 1967 and an improved version in September 1971.  The introduction coincided with the nationwide introduction of all figure numbering.  This dial was also fitted to all factory refurbished telephones that had a Dials, Automatic, No. 21CA.

The coloured finger plate was displaced by a clear plastic finger plate and the number ring, bearing arrowheads (Chaplets),  replaced by a number ring with black figures on a back ground coloured antique silver.

All Telephones No. 746 were fitted with this dial.

Later manufactured Dial No. 21's will be found with plastic impulse wheel/spring cover and trigger mechanism.

Front view Rear view

Dials, Automatic, Nos. 21FA Steel
This is a Dial, Automatic, No. 21FA fitted with a steel dial and a Kit No. 269A.  The Kit No. 269A is a Perspex dial label cover with a centre screw with an Allen key head.  This was to prevent vandalism.  (Dial No. 21 Steel is shown pictured to the right).

Dials, Automatic, Nos. 1/21FA Clear
This is a low inertia Dial No. 21 produced specially for the Compact telephone - Telephone No. 776.

Dials, Automatic, No. 21 Additional Information
Variants exist of Dial No. 21 too.  GEC tried a design having a finger wheel with spokes rather than holes; later it also made a very cheap dial with many metal parts replaced by plastic.  Click here for the GEC spoked variant & Click here for the GEC cheapened Dial.  These were used on PAX telephones and were also supplied to the New Zealand Post Office.

Other designations:  AEI called the Dial No. 12 their Dial Switch 20.  Ericsson named the Dial No. 10 their N4381 and the Dial No. 21 their N4394.  GEC named the Dial No. 12 their DL 1100 series (standard), DL 1200 series (tropical finish).

Export models: British manufacturers made versions of these dials for overseas use, including New Zealand numbering, Canadian letters and numbers, Egyptian numbers only, English and Egyptian numbers, also English and Chinese numbers.  Click here for pictures.

Click here for more information on the Dial No. 21.

Dials, Automatic, No. 22FA and 22LA
This dial has a stainless steel finger plate and a mechanism similar to that of Dial, Automatic, No. 13, mounted on a moulded body.  The FA variant is fitted with a non-Director number ring bearing figures only (Label No. 427) whilst the LA variant has figures only.  It supersedes Dial, Automatic, No. 13FA.  Fitted with an additional springset which was normally made.  When the digits 9 or 0 are dialled, the springs remain open until the pulsing stops.  Used on coin collecting boxes and shown pictured below.

Dials, Automatic, No. 22 Dials, Automatic, No. 23

Dials, Automatic, No. 23LA
Used in Director areas, this has a mechanism similar to that of Dial, Automatic, No. 20, mounted on a moulded body.  It is fitted with a stainless-steel finger plate and a number ring bearing figures and letters.  Supersedes Dial, Automatic, No. 20LA.  Shown pictured above.

Dials, Automatic, Nos. 23FA
As above but with figures only

Dials, Automatic, No. 24F
This dial has a similar mechanism to Dial, Automatic, No. 19, mounted on a moulded body.  It is fitted with a number ring bearing figures only and a black P.V.C. finger plate.  Supersedes Dials, Automatic, No. 19FA.

Dials, Automatic, No. 25CA
This dial is similar to Dial, Automatic, No. 25FA except that it has a grey P.V.C. finger plate and a number ring bearing arrowheads.  It is for use on the operator's telephone of Switchboard, P.M.B.X., No. 2/... where inter-switchboard circuits are provided for dialling into P.A.B.X.s.  The dial is fitted with an additional springset with the contacts made when stationary and broken when off normal.

Dials, Automatic, Nos. 25FA Clear
This dial is similar to Dial, Automatic, No. 25CA except that the grey P.V.C. finger plate and number ring bearing arrowheads are replaced by a clear finger plate and a number ring with figures, coloured antique silver.  The dial is fitted with an additional springset with the contacts made when normal and broken when off normal.  This dial has a standard impulse wheel marked A1 and runs at 10pps.

Dials, Automatic, Nos. 25FA FT3 Dials, Automatic, Nos. 25FA FT4

Dials, Automatic, Nos. 25FA FT3 and 25FA FT4
These have mechanisms similar to Dials, Automatic, Nos. 16LA, 16LT3 and 16LT4 respectively, mounted on a moulded body.  The dials are fitted with a number ring bearing figures and a clear finger plate. These dials are used in testers and supersede Dials, Automatic, No. 16.  The dial is fitted with an additional springset with the contacts made when normal and broken when off normal.

The FT3 has a 80% break and 12pps.  This dial is usually found with a dial label stating "ADB 80/12" or similar.  The impulse wheel is stamped "T3 80%B.

The FT4 has a 50% break and 12pps.  This dial is usually found with a dial label stating "ADA 50/12" or similar.  The impulse wheel is stamped "T4 50%B".

Dials, Automatic, Nos. 25LA, 25LT3 and 25LT4
These have mechanisms similar to Dials, Automatic, Nos. 16LA, 16LT3 and 16LT4 respectively, mounted on a moulded body.  The dials are fitted with a number ring bearing figures and letters, and a black P.V.C. finger plate.  These dials are used in testers and supersede Dials, Automatic, No. 16.  See the Dials, Automatic No. 25FA for the specification.

Dials, Automatic, No. 26LA
This is a modified Dial, Automatic, No. 10 fitted in a flameproof enclosure and is used with the Telephone No. 149.  The flameproof construction requires it to have an additional spindle and to prevent this impeding the return of the pulsing mechanism the steel finger plate is coupled to the pulsing mechanism by means of a clutch.  At the moment of release of the finger plate it is declutched from the pulsing mechanism and returns to normal very quickly under the action of an additional coiled spring.  The return of the pulsing mechanism is therefore unimpeded.  When the finger plate returns to normal it is locked until the completion of pulsing.  Then when the mechanism returns to normal the finger plate is unlocked and the next digit can be dialled.  The finger plate should be locked by repositioning the screw in the flyback mechanism when the Telephone No. 149 is used on C.B. systems.

Dials, Automatic, No. 28LA
This dial has a mechanism similar to that of a Dial, Automatic, No. 22 but modified by the addition of a cam so that the contacts of the auxiliary spring-set are closed during the pulsing of any contact other than '9'.  It is used on installations where outgoing access is required to be limited to the '999' emergency service only.

Dial No. 28 (rear view) is shown to the right.

Dials, Automatic, Nos. 28FA Clear
As above but fitted with a clear finger plate and a number ring with figures, coloured antique silver.

Dials, Automatic, No. 30LA
This dial is similar to Dial, Automatic No 21 but has a fluorescent tube beneath the finger plate for illumination.  This dial is only used in Telephone No. 722 (Trimphone).

The dial finger plate is tinted a very light Lilac colour and the dial body is slightly oversized, so as to locate under the telephone case.

Click here for more information on the Dial No. 30.

Dial No. 30

Front View Front View with Dial Finger plate and number label removed, exposing Tritium tube. Rear View

Dials, Automatic, No. 35FA Clear
Figures only dial, similar to the Dials, Automatic, No. 21FA Clear, but with additional springset with the contacts made when normal and broken when off normal..  Used on testers.  Runs at 10pps and has a 66.6% break.  The Dial No. 35 is shown pictured below.

Dials, Automatic, No. 51A
Made by GEC this is an all plastic reduced cost dial.  Replacement for Dial, Automatic, No. 21.

Dials, Automatic, No. 54A
Later dial made completely of plastic.  Superseded Dials, Automatic, No. 21 for general use.

Front view Rear view

Dials for blind subscribers and subscribers with defective sight
The modification of dials for blind subscribers is described in Control C 1001.  For subscribers having in operating the dial due to defective sight, the procedure outlined in M 0025 should be followed.

 
 
BACK Home page BT/GPO Telephones Search the Site Glossary of Telecom Terminology Quick Find All Telephone Systems

Last revised: August 13, 2012

FM